Sonny Stitt – Moonlight In Vermont (1977) {Denon Japan 38C38-7046 rel 1983}

Sonny Stitt - Moonlight In Vermont (1977) {Denon Japan 38C38-7046 rel 1983}

Sonny Stitt – Moonlight In Vermont (1977) {Denon Japan 38C38-7046 rel 1983}
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© 1977, 1983 Denon / Nippon Columbia | 38C38-7046
Jazz / Bop / Saxophone

Sonny Stitt, doubling on alto and tenor, is in fine form on this quartet session (a Japanese import CD) with either Barry Harris or Walter Davis on piano, bassist Reggie Workman and drummer Tony Williams. The repertoire (bop standards, blues and ballads) is fairly typical and nothing too unusual occurs, but fans of straightahead jazz in general and Sonny Stitt in particular will be satisfied with this above-average effort, highlighted by “It Might as Well Be Spring” and “Constellation.”

Continue reading “Sonny Stitt – Moonlight In Vermont (1977) {Denon Japan 38C38-7046 rel 1983}”

Sonny Stitt – Moonlight In Vermont (1977) {Denon Japan 38C38-7046 rel 1983}

Gerry Mulligan – Jeru (1962) {2014 Japan Jazz Collection 1000 Columbia-RCA Series SICP 4024}

Gerry Mulligan - Jeru (1962) {2014 Japan Jazz Collection 1000 Columbia-RCA Series SICP 4024}

Gerry Mulligan – Jeru (1962) {2014 Japan Jazz Collection 1000 Columbia-RCA Series SICP 4024}
EAC rip (secure mode) | FLAC (tracks)+CUE+LOG -> 235 Mb | MP3 @320 -> 85 Mb
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© 1962, 2014 Columbia / Sony Music Japan | SICP 4024
Jazz / Cool / West Coast Jazz / Baritone Saxophone

Reissue with latest 2014 DSD remastering. Comes with liner notes. Jeru was a favor that Gerry Mulligan did for his drummer, Dave Bailey, who owned a startup label called Jazzline. Mulligan was bet-ween recording contracts. The ensemble played together only once, during the four-and-a-half-hour session when Jeru was made in 1962. It features Tommy Flanagan on piano, Ben Tucker on bass, Bailey on drums and Alec Dorsey on congas. The album never appeared on Jazzline because CBS bought the master and released it on Columbia.

It was Mulligan’s first-ever experience of recording with a piano without the presence of other soloists. Not for a moment would you suspect that he is in uncharted waters. Jeru flawlessly swings with a relaxed, throbbing, positive life force. Mulligan’s guttural gliding and Flanagan’s pristine comping are almost too perfect for jazz. “Here I’ll Stay” and “You’ve Come Home” could roll and tumble forever. The concluding “Lonely Town” begins in poignant whispers but can’t resist the pull of sprightly double time.

The recorded sound, achieved by an unidentified engineer at Nola Penthouse Studio in New York City, has remarkable presence and three-dimensionality. Jeru is one of the quickest 30 minutes in jazz.

Gerry Mulligan – Jeru (1962) {2014 Japan Jazz Collection 1000 Columbia-RCA Series SICP 4024}

Lim – Superlim (2006) {Kopasetic KOPACD010 rec 2004}

Lim - Superlim (2006) {Kopasetic KOPACD010 rec 2004}

Lim – Superlim (2006) {Kopasetic KOPACD010 rec 2004}
EAC rip (secure mode) | FLAC (tracks)+CUE+LOG -> 217 Mb | MP3 @320 -> 108 Mb
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© 2006 Kopasetic Productions | KOPACD01
Jazz / Minimal / Avant-Garde Jazz / Sweden / Ambient Jazz

Superlim is lim´s second album (their first one was released on db-productions in 2002). This album was recorded in December 2004 and mixed, edited and produced by David Carlsson and lim in 2006. lim´s music is (still) based on rhytmic ideas, but the sound of the group has evolved into a more acoustic and suggestive one.

The jazz trio Lim, from Malmo, Sweden, display a proclivity for impromptu musical wanderings born from the imagination and bred through avant-garde techniques and Modern-free outgrowths. Their songs are mainly Blues-free tints moored by sparse rhythms and conditioned with bluesy wavelengths emitted from Henrik Frisk’s saxophone, David Carlsson’s bass, and Peter Nilsson’s drum strides. Their freelance quills and coiling textures have a common factor with avant-garde performances by Grachan Moncur III, Albert Ayler, and Pharoah Sanders. The absence of defining melodies gives the songs a free-for-all form with installations of dawdling notes, sauntering rhythms, and improvised musical ideas. The mobility and shapes of the sonic craters and composites are personally determined by their creator, crafting a plethora of disoriented and contorted sound constellations.

Lim’s current album, their sophomore release Superlim, is Sound Art at its highest level of freedom. The music has reflections of the experimental jazz phrases presented in the ‘60s avant-garde films made famous by director Federico Fellini and still practiced in many Parisian jazz parlors. From the start, the listener feels like an observer with tracks like “Shulaffel” and “Vito” spritzing drum strokes and pacifying bass tugs as sprinting saxophone notes poke through the rhythm links, sprouting tingling outgrowths along the chord progressions. There is a sense of uncertainty in the sax notes about what to play and where to go as the instrument pulses interact and act as a catalyst for each others frequencies and nebulas. The direction and progression of the instrument lines are unpredictable, testing the waters and taking risks, curiously venturing outside of the Blues-jazz discipline.

The drifts in the series of notes are extemporized and inventively orchestrated, making the listener a mere watcher of this expedition. At times, the music has an opiate feel like “Nephilim” and “Getting’ Tage,” possessing a Stoner-jazz inflection, and at other times, the music is like Math-jazz manipulating the notes configurations and brightness like on the tracks “Captain Anna (And His Crew)” and “TraneBird.” Sax notes are inverted, exaggerated, elongated, and shortened at whim, fluxing between languid and dizzying motions. The final track “Re: Happy” tests different sonic combinations, varying the tempo and stanza ranges and thickening up the textures. Notes are more stressed and hurried creating a formation of bristling dynamics.

Lim’s tooling with rhythms and notes resonance explores organic movements and shapes of sounds. The band which formed 10 years ago, builds a forum for rhythmical freedom and contorted structures that bend and twist in ways that are completely unique and avant-garde. Ancient folk tales insist that the power of three is extremely potent and lim shows that to be certifiably true.

Lim – Superlim (2006) {Kopasetic KOPACD010 rec 2004}

Gary Bartz – Anthology (2004) {Soul Brother Records CD SBPJ 23}

Gary Bartz - Anthology (2004) {Soul Brother Records CD SBPJ 23}

Gary Bartz – Anthology (2004) {Soul Brother Records CD SBPJ 23}
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© 1970s, 2004 Soul Brother Records / Passion Music | CD SBPJ 23
Jazz / Jazz Funk / Modern Creative / Soul Jazz

Soul Brother has given us a long overdue compilation of Gary Bartz’s experimental jazz material from the 1970s, beginning with his classic Harlem Bush Music albums, Taifa and Uhuru from 1970 and 1971, with his band NTU Troop. While it’s impossible to overstate the influence his brief tenure with Miles Davis had on him (Bartz is featured on the Live-Evil recordings), the saxophonist and composer was exploring other avenues of creative black music as well, from funk to soul to the blues. The 12 cuts here begin with the sublime “Celestial Blues,” from that seminal NTU Troop debut set.

The band included vocalist/keyboardist Andy Bey, bassist Ron Carter, drummer Harold White, and percussionist Nat Bettis in the mix. Following is “Uhuru Sasa,” with a killer call-and-response vocal from Bartz and Bey, and “Drinking Song,” which similarly follows suit but with a fiery, deep solo from Bartz. “Dr. Follow’s Dance” from Follow the Medicine Man marks the accent on the blistering electric funk groove. Bey left the band and was replaced by Hubert Eaves, II, who added a smoother, more R&B-oriented dimension to the band’s sound. “I’ve Known Rivers” is from the live set of the same name, with Stafford James on bass and Eaves on acoustic and electric piano, and melds soul, R&B, and Native American folk music with Bartz’s post-Coltrane modal sensibilities. Bartz’s vocal is just beautiful and inspiring here. The transition is complete with “I Wanna Be Where You Are,” written by T-Boy Ross and Leon Ware. Spacey for Marvin Gaye, slippery, shimmering, and utterly in the pocket, it winds through the entire history of black music to execute its popping ethereal groove. There are also tracks here from Juju Man and the rare Shadow Do (“Sea Gypsy”/”Gentle Smiles”). The disc’s final two offerings come from Bartz’s Blue Note album, Music Is My Sanctuary, which was produced by Larry Mizell; these include the title track and “Carnaval de l’Espirit.” What is notable about these final two songs is their utter abandonment of the jazz fake-book (even with a very large – 17 piece – band) for urban soul. The late vocalist Syreeta Wright is present on these tunes, as are Wah Wah Watson, Mtume, and Eddie Henderson. These last two selections are the bookends that show just how far Bartz had traveled on his journey, always keeping melody, harmony, and innovative rhythmic and modal ideas at the center of his aesthetic. Anthology is highly recommended for a slim but nonetheless dynamite portrait of the artist during one of the most exciting periods of his career.

Gary Bartz – Anthology (2004) {Soul Brother Records CD SBPJ 23}

Various Artists – Dr. L. Subramaniam Presents Lakshminarayana Global Music Festival (1992-2000) {2CD Sony Music-Viji Records L2C 3008 2} (ft. Herbie Hancock}

Various Artists - Dr. L. Subramaniam Presents Lakshminarayana Global Music Festival (1992-2000) {ft. Herbie Hancock}

Various Artists – Dr. L. Subramaniam Presents Lakshminarayana Global Music Festival (1992-2000) {2CD Sony Music-Viji Records L2C 3008 2} (ft. Herbie Hancock}
EAC rip (secure mode) | FLAC (tracks)+CUE+LOG -> 370 Mb | MP3 @320 -> 184 Mb
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© 1992-2000 Sony Music / Viji Records | L2C 3008 2
Folk Music / Western Classical / Indian Classical / Fusion / Classical Crossover / World Music

Dr. Laxminarayana is renowened violinist and the father of three outstanding violin players namely Dr. L. Subramaniam, L. Shankar and L. Vaidyanathan. This music of this album is recorded in Dr. Laxminarayana Global Music Festival conduced in various countries from 1992 to 2000. The performances included in this album ranges from World Fusion to Roots and Folk to Western Classical & Indian Classical. Along with Dr. L. Subramaniam, Some stellar musicians have been participated in this festival including Herbie Hancock, Jean-Pierre Rampal, Jie-Bing Chen etc. Enjoy.

Various Artists - Dr. L. Subramaniam Presents Lakshminarayana Global Music Festival (1992-2000) {ft. Herbie Hancock}
Various Artists – Dr. L. Subramaniam Presents Lakshminarayana Global Music Festival (1992-2000) {2CD Sony Music-Viji Records L2C 3008 2} (ft. Herbie Hancock}

Malia – Yellow Daffodils (2003) {Epic 503369/5 – bonus tracks}

Malia - Yellow Daffodils (2003) {Epic 503369/5 - bonus tracks}

Malia – Yellow Daffodils (2003) {Epic 503369/5 – bonus tracks}
EAC rip (secure mode) | FLAC (tracks)+CUE+LOG -> 435 Mb | MP3 @320 -> 138 Mb
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© 2003 Epic / Rêve Orange / Sony Music | 503369/5
Jazz / Vocal Jazz / Neo Soul / Soul Jazz / Jazz Pop

Malia’s vocal style is one that’s powerful, jazzy, classy, and daring from a musical perspective. The different tracks on the album showcase her willingness to experiment with big-band, jazz, hip-hop, soul, and international sounds. A couple of tracks that stand out are the up-beat “Lifting you high,” her sensual and seductive “India Song,” and her rendition of “solitude.” It is quite a shame that this artist will (probably) never see her album being released in the uS, as her style doesn’t “fit” the mold of the American urban and R&B stations. It is too classy to be noticed by fans of simple stuff like Ashanti or Mariah Carey.

Wow this album has such a great chilled-out feel good vibe to it. It compliments jazz smoothness with an up to date urban feel. It has a great jazz club feel to it (I think she used to sing in clubs in London). It is a really beautiful album.
Think of a felame Omar and you’re getting somewhere close.
The remixes are also r&b orientated, so this album is perfect for relaxing to.

Malia – Yellow Daffodils (2003) {Epic 503369/5 – bonus tracks}

Gerry Mulligan – California Concerts Volume 2 (1954) {Pacific Jazz-EMI CDP 7 46864 2 rel 1988}

Gerry Mulligan - California Concerts Volume 2 (1954) {Pacific Jazz-EMI CDP 7 46864 2 rel 1988}

Gerry Mulligan – California Concerts Volume 2 (1954) {Pacific Jazz-EMI CDP 7 46864 2 rel 1988}
EAC rip (secure mode) | FLAC (tracks)+CUE+LOG -> 382 Mb | MP3 @320 -> 163 Mb
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© 1954, 1988 Pacific Jazz / EMI-Capitol Records | CDP 7 46864 2
Jazz / Cool / West Coast Jazz / Baritone Saxophone

 

The second of two CDs in this series mostly consists of previously unissued material taken from a high school concert featuring the Gerry Mulligan Quartet (which at the time featured trumpeter Jon Eardley) plus two guests (valve trombonist Bob Brookmeyer and tenor-saxophonist Zoot Sims). This swinging and often-witty cool bop music is quite enjoyable and highly recommended.

After having heard Vol. 1 I had to get this one. It has mostly the same personnel as Vol. one with a few different players on some tracks. None the less it is another fine west coast jazz performance from the 50s. It is recorded on mono in a high school gym! Surprisingly good sound though. Vol. 1 and 2 are both worthy additions to any jazz fan’s collection.

Continue reading “Gerry Mulligan – California Concerts Volume 2 (1954) {Pacific Jazz-EMI CDP 7 46864 2 rel 1988}”

Gerry Mulligan – California Concerts Volume 2 (1954) {Pacific Jazz-EMI CDP 7 46864 2 rel 1988}